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Books 3 & 4 Membership

Subscribe now to get Severo Sarduy’s Footwork: Selected Poems translated by David Francis, as well as whatever exciting book we decide to publish as our fourth work. Also extra stuff! And your name in the back of our books!

Books 1 & 2 Membership

Still available. Receive Camouflage and Tell Me, Kenyalang and have your name listed in print as a Member. We’ll also send you a Circumference Tote Bag and other surprises. Be an integral part of sustaining our press. Free shipping in the US!

Books

Camouflage

By Lupe Gómez, translated from Galician by Erín Moure

In Camouflage, Lupe Gómez renders her mother and her mother tongue, her land and its changes with tender, sharp insight, and Erín Moure brings into English this native language of Galicia in Spain so vividly that we can feel the original breathing beneath the surface.

Tell Me, Kenyalang

By Kulleh Grasi, translated from Malay by Pauline Fan

Kulleh Grasi’s poems capture the excited intimacy exploring one’s own beloved country with depth and vision. Grasi leaps between languages, registers, and landscapes to create a multi-dimensional book, and Pauline Fan, in her translations, leaps with him into a detailed, rich English, while finding innovative ways to provide context to a place so rarely read about in English.

Footwork

By Severo Sarduy, translated from Spanish by David Francis

Cuban writer Severo Sarduy was one of the most groundbreaking Latin American writers of the twentieth century. This is the first collection of his poetry to appear in English translation and represents poems from throughout Sarduy’s life, following the thrilling trajectory of a great thinker. David Francis translated the poems from Spanish into an acrobatic English. The title, Footwork, “recognizes how Sarduy’s poems deliver devastating wit, which lands on its prototypical feet or adroitly maneuvers, purposefully, around naming objects, people, or body parts and toward unexpected endings,” writes Francis. This collection makes it clear why Gabriel García Márquez once called Sarduy the best writer in the Spanish language.